About your Search

20130115
20130123
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 13
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be some way for the 11 million people who are here without their papers to somehow get right with the law. >> what's next for the debate in congress? as the debt ceiling hovers over head? >>> plus governor jerry brown up close and personal. in an exclusive interview with pbs "newshour's" spencer michels. >> it drives me crazy when people say, you haven't done anything. should we cut the colleges more and pump it into the prisons? >> our spotlight on politics coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." with the presidential inauguration coming up on monday, and major developments this week on gun control and immigration reform, we focus tonight on politics from california to washington, d.c. we'll hear from governor jerry brown later in the program. and to help analyze it all, we're joined in studio by carla marinucci, "san francisco chronic chronicle" senior political reporter." debra saunders, "san francisco chronicle" conservative columnist. scott shafer, host of the "california report" joining us from washington, d.c. scott, let's start with you. yo
that man went through. he did not have secret service protection. and law enforcement in the towns where he was working were against him. some of them were members -- klan members. i cannot comprehend the degree of courage that was required and yet look at what he did each and every day. getting up, speaking out, marching, leading. it reminds me of that tradition where the stuff we go through now, i get called names. people call me up, i am sorry about that bad newspaper article about you. that review on the debate, that was rough, i thought that was unfair. i am thinking, no one is during a brick through my window. -- throwing a brick through my window. the country has changed in a profound way. when i am travelling through iowa which does not have a large african-american population and you see their response of the people and the croats, you get a sense that folks are ready to transcend some of these issues. that is not to say that the country is going to be color blind in this race. that will be an issue for blacks and whites. one of the things that surface is people have some confused
in a room and ask them, what is it that you do, how did you get this job? now -- a lot of them came from law, none of them came from accounting. there merchants, basically. this is not to disrespect them or demean their role in any way but at the same time, you cannot expect them to know who they are signing and sort of gate keep the music. if this matters to you but let me ask anyway. what is your sense of how the public has you do as a personality over the years and how that has changed? do you concern yourself with that? are you conscious of how you have been viewed over the course of your career? does it matter to you? what do you think about what people think of you, if you think about that all? >> that is kind of a deep question. tavis: i get one every now and then. >> i am sort of like a -- because of the stances i take, people will have different viewpoints of me depending on which side of the fans were sitting on. like we talked about the music industry, a merchant would have trouble being called a bean counter. they would be hard pressed to try to sing a song with me. i do not care
, the law enforcement people here arrested him. i could not understand why they arrested him when he got back to atlanta. that was his home. that is what it was. they had accused him of perjury, a very serious crime. when he realized that this was what had happened -- it had to happen, he had to pay something like $1,500. not a lot of money -- in that day, it was a pretty good sum of money. he said, i do not have time to get lawyers and go to court, so i will pay this even though i do not owe it. they said that by paying it, that was an admission of guilt. he got very depressed, extremely depressed. he said, "i will spend the rest of my life trying to prove that i did not steal the money." i said, "you know you did not steal it. you just have to go on. people will eventually no." -- eventually know the bank -- know." the undersecretary of the united nations said to him, "martin, if the state it -- if the state of alabama is against yours, who do you think they will believe?" tavis: i want to be respectful, but i want to find a way to ask this question. any number of comedians -- we have
the way it was written in the law. we have seen that and this is a pretty compelling group of stocks. you have low payout and bond rates are low so you can buy dividend stocks that yield well relative total attorney difficults in the bond market. on the megacap stocks you have a lot of large high quality american companies that should be able to grow at or higher than the rate of the market or cheaper than the market and also have those higher dividends. >> susie: and the other two sectors that you also recommend to your morgan stanley clients, health care, companies like cardinal health, and industrials like honeywell, general motors what is the story there? >> well, for health care look, when you want to be a little defensive in the markets's natural for people to think about two sectors, health care and staples. we really like health care more than staples right now. we see that pretty clearly. health-care companies are beating estimates more, they have higher cash balances and you know they are much cheaper. they really never have been cheaper on forward earnings relative to staples s
and oil refineries is not acting unilaterally. it's following the law. >> reporter: a draft of a new federal report warns americans are already experiencing more droughts and floods and are seeing rising sea levels as the climate changes. and as superstorm sandy has shown, the costs of dealing with extreme weather are also rising. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: while the super bowl marks the grand finale for football season, it's also the priciest event for u.s. television advertising. viewers can expect to see ads from big brand names like taco bell, chrysler and pepsi. but can companies expect a good return on their investment this year? rick horrow explains in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." >> reporter: advertising during the super bowl is an expensive and risky. for nearly $4 million, companies get 30 seconds to pitch themselves to more than 100 million americans watching. making the challenge even more daunting for advertisers, it is a crowded broadcast with dozens of companies vying for your attention, buying commercial time during the super bowl broadcast. a
the overthrow of moammar qaddafi, libya's strong man. aqim has established strict islamist law in northern mali and destroyed dozens of aish went movings -- ancient mosques and tombs. the united nations has declared it a culture heritage site. the french president asked the u.s. to help france's military in using manpower and drones. >> question, what's at stake for the u.s. in mali? >> clearly, we and the rest of the world don't really want the al qaeda affiliate to establish its roots there. the government is weak. it's not a democratic government. and so defense secretary leon panetta has said that the u.s. government is willing to assist the french with logistics and intelligence. the drones you mentioned are not -- they would not be armed drones. they would be intelligence gathering drones but the french have taken the lead on n. i think so far the u.s. is standing on the side lienls pretty much -- sidelines pretty much cheering them on because it's an important mission. >> we've sent 55,000 americans there according to-- >> 50 million? >> what is it? 550 americans and they are there not a
his family moved, he encountered racism head on. he went to law school and became an advocate for tenants rights in boston where he began to scratch poems on legal pads while waiting in court houses for cases to be called. you can't read any of his 16 books of poems and essay, and most recently, the trouble ball, without understanding a man who is a struggling writer, whose past is a living, breathing news whispering over his shoulder as he scribbles the names of ancestors who once pulled the oars over troubled waters. it was in the wake of president barack obama's victory that brought him here, to the former slave frederick douglas skpchlt with it, a poem. >> rochester, new york, november 7, 2008. this is the long titude and latitude of the impossible. this is the epicenter of the unthinkable. this is the crossroads of the unimaginable, the tomb of frederick douglas three days after the election. this is a world spinning away from the gravity of centuries where the grave of a fugitive slave has become an altar. this is a tomb of a man born as chattel who taught himself to rea
the first mother-in-law walk through the marion robertson, ma leaand sasha obama. ma leais 14 and sasha is 11. they are dressed head to toe in jay crew. >> thank you for the fashion. >> i will be keeping up with the fashion all day. >> what do you look to in the past when you look at a second inaugural? >> i think it's another affirmation of the american system, have people out on the mall, see the president and the transfer of power and that's the glory of american system and that's what george washington brought, the first person to give up power, no one thought he was going to do it. even though it's a ceremony but it's a ceremony that is -- it bring's lot to our country and to our nation. >> is it one of those ceremonies, do you agree with beverly and richard that the second time in many respects, speaks more to what people's expectations are of their president than the first time. >> there's been an affirmation of what braun did by a majority of american people. and it turns out, a bigger majority than people thought. many people thought he wasn't going to win at all so this is, i
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)